Storytelling and communication styles

In my past life, I wore many hats working in public relations and marketing for a retail corporate office. My role and responsibilities had really evolved over time however one area I consistently had a hand in was our corporate newsletter. This newsletter reached all staff within two corporate offices, three warehouses and over 200 stores across Canada. The newsletter celebrated milestones both professional and personal, extended sad news, shared tips and tricks, recipes, etc. But most importantly celebrated each store’s grand opening with a play by play of their grand opening weekend that usually included a summary of the weekend’s sales, customer turnout, a list of thank yous, and several pictures to accompany their story.

 

Receiving content was generally easy enough, most of the owners and managers would supply their contributions well within the deadlines however their stories needed a lot of editing to make it readable and easy to understand or even translate for our French speaking/reading staff members. Or you have the opposite side of the spectrum where the submission was a plain paragraph that lacked pizazz to make the reader interested in the story.

 

Most of my colleagues had gone to post-secondary for business or another similar minded field that didn’t focus on how to write a story.

 

If I could have, I would have sent each manager a link to Five Tips for Better Business Writing or Harvard Business Review’s How to Improve Your Business Writing as these articles hit all the key points without intimidating a newbie writer. And of course, I can’t stress enough about taking time in proofing spelling and grammar!

 

At the end of the day we are all on the same team with a common message – to make lots of money but also to celebrate each other’s achievements. There is no better way to do other then highlight in a newsletter of their perfect grand opening and I felt a part of their grand opening by effectively communicating their message to the audience.

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