Social Media: The Benevolant Borg

If you identify as a Trekkie, has the whole concept of no money and self-cleaning homes led to fantasies of living aboard the Enterprise?  For the past quarter century, I couldn’t get my head around either of these concepts:  how could earthlings could ever evolve and develop this Utopian society.

 

A Thriving Cashless Society

 

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Gene Rodenberry, the creator of Star Trek, envisioned a post scarcity economy where there was no money.  As everyone had all the necessities of life, people worked for personal development, allowing their curiosity to fuel their activities.

Although we all still have to work, perhaps social media has sparked an economic and social shift in how we drive our society.

We have moved from:

  • Building Monster Homes to building Tiny Homes
  • Buying tools to sharing tools through the library
  • Funding through banks to crowd funding
  • Buying clothes to swapping clothes
  • Disposing stuff at Value Village to trading stuff on Bunz
  • Buying a single family dwelling to cohousing
  • Calling an expert to solve a problem to consulting the Internet for solutions
  • Competing to succeed to successful collaborating

 

Social Media Nurtures Our Confidence in New Ideas

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Currency is a faith-based concept that allows us to place a value on a commodity.  Social media has created the tipping point where money is now a currency of choice, but not the only option.

Anyone can have an idea, float it out there for discussion, find like-minded and multi-talented collaborators, and quickly transform their idea into a project.  For ideas to take flight, they no longer need companies or governments.  They need moral support, followed by action; the moral support is akin to faith-based currency.

When I make a trade with someone on Bunz, I believe that the trade is fair and the other person won’t just show up and rob me.  My faith is based on watching others make their trades successfully; the moment I got a sofa in exchange for soil, I was hooked.

When I donate my candle making equipment to the tool library, I believe that I can come and borrow it the next time I really need it because I believe that the people running the library won’t rob me blind.

Why do I have faith that they are truly librarians?

  • On social media, I saw the idea of community tools discussed.
  • I participated in the discussions.
  • I saw a core group trying to figure out how to make it so, asking the hive for practical help.
  • I donated to the crowd-funding for the library because I had knowledge of the concept and the people driving it forward. I had never met them face-to-face, but the online conversations gave me confidence in them.
  • I boosted the signal in my own network by reposting articles and posting my own thoughts.

And now, I am loving the idea of minimalist living – but I still want to be able to make candles without paying for real estate to store the equipment. And I still can’t figure out self-cleaning homes.

 

Have You Joined the Cashless Economy?

borg “In an ideal world” used to be accompanied by a sigh of resignation.  Now, discussions on various social media platforms are moving us towards an ideal world by tapping into the hive mind which exponentially increases our collective knowledge, perhaps the most lucrative currency today.

 

Has social media given you confidence in a new idea?

What alternatives to money have you used?

 

The Reading List

https://www.weforum.org/agenda/2016/04/6-ways-social-media-is-changing-the-world/

http://www.shoutmeloud.com/how-much-has-social-media-changed-society.html

http://3tags.org/article/the-economics-of-star-trek-the-proto-post-scarcity-economy

 

 

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